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10 Tips For Better Case Histories

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The case history provides an overview of a customer experience or end user application, demonstrating how a product or service meets the needs of the user in question.

Done well, a case history is a powerful sales tool that can be put to a wide range of PR and marketing purposes. It is highly valued by editors and represents once of the best ways of achieving detailed, in-depth coverage in the trade and business media.

Below are ten tips on what to remember when drafting and orchestrating a case history:

1. Consider the primary audience. Sales channel or end user? If sales, then direct – or dealers and distributors?

2. Highlight any challenges the application presented and explain clearly how these were overcome.

3. Focus on the business benefits that have been achieved, such as efficiencies gained or processes improved.

4. Underline any financial savings made; expressed in monetary terms if possible, or percentages if not.

5. Obtain written approvals from all parties – especially the end user and share target
media lists if requested.

6. Source visually arresting images to accompany the case history, even if these are only library shots.

7. Tie the case history to any regulations that govern the use or specification of the product or service.

8. Include supportive quotes from the end user or the customer wherever possible.

9. Produce a more sales-orientated version of the case history to form the basis of
powerful sales collateral.

10. Consider turning the case history into a brief video – especially if end users are willing to talk.

A Glossary of SEO Terms

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Algorithm: The technology that a search engine uses to deliver results to a query. Search engines utilise several algorithms to deliver search results.

Backlinks: A backlink is any link received by a web page; directory; or website. These back links bring traffic to a web page. Backlinks are an important element that most search engine algorithms use to measure the popularity of a web page.

Blog: A personal or themed journal published online, consisting of entries (“posts”) displayed in chronological order, typically expressing the interests or expertise of the writer.

Click Through Rate (CTR): The rate (expressed in a percentage) at which users click on an ad. This is calculated by dividing the total number of clicks by the total number of ad impressions. CTR is an important metric for online marketers to measure the performance of an ad campaign.

Directory Indexing: One of the key factors of online directory submissions is the creation of backlinks to a site. By listing a website in the top directories, a website will get the required exposure online. This will then mean that the website will be indexed

Blog: A personal or themed journal published online, consisting of entries (“posts”) displayed in chronological order, typically expressing the interests or expertise of the writer.

Click Through Rate (CTR): The rate (expressed in a percentage) at which users click on an ad. This is calculated by dividing the total number of clicks by the total number of ad impressions. CTR is an important metric for online marketers to measure the performance of an ad campaign. Directory Indexing: One of the key factors of online directory submissions is the creation of backlinks to a site. By listing a website in the top directories, a website will get the required exposure online. This will then mean that the website will be indexed

Directory Indexing: One of the key factors of online directory submissions is the creation of backlinks to a site. By listing a website in the top directories, a website will get the required exposure online. This will then mean that the website will be indexed through search engines and improve rankings.

Keyword Density: Ensuring that content reads naturally and detracts from ‘keyword stuffing’ (when keywords are continually being mentioned). Content that is not dismissed as spam and therefore not a negative effect on SEO.

Link Bait: Editorial content, which is often sensational in nature, posted on a web page and submitted to social media sites in hopes of building inbound links from other sites.

Link Building: The process of getting quality websites to link to your website, in order to improve search engine rankings. Link building techniques can include buying links, reciprocal linking, or entering barter arrangements.Meta Tags: Information placed in the HTML header of a web page, providing information that is not visible to browsers, but can be used in varying degrees by search engines to index a page. Common meta tags used in search engine marketing are

Meta Tags: Information placed in the HTML header of a web page, providing information that is not visible to browsers, but can be used in varying degrees by search engines to index a page. Common meta tags used in search engine marketing are title, description, and keyword tags. On-page/Off-page Optimisation: SEO is divided into two key areas.

On-page/Off-page Optimisation: SEO is divided into two key areas. On-page optimisation which covers improvement to the pages themselves (content, keywords, meta description tags, ALT tags, internal linking, keyword density, and usability). Off-page optimisation is the activity that can be done off the pages of a website to maximise its ranking in search engines (link building, inbound links, AdWord campaigns, and tracking all active keywords).

Organic Links: To help generate backlinks to a website it is important to build up organic links to a site. Search engines register the links as recommendations to a site and the more people you have sharing content, the more you will improve on SEO rankings. Pay Per Click (PPC) or

Cost Per Click (CPC): A performance based advertising model where the advertiser pays a set fee for every click on an ad. The majority of text ads sold by search engines are billed under the PPC model. Search Engine Marketing (SEM): The process of building and marketing a site with the goal of improving its position in search engine results. SEM includes both search engine

Pay Per Click (PPC) or Cost Per Click (CPC): A performance based advertising model where the advertiser pays a set fee for every click on an ad. The majority of text ads sold by search engines are billed under the PPC model.

Search Engine Marketing (SEM): The process of building and marketing a site with the goal of improving its position in search engine results. SEM includes both search engine results.  SEM includes both search engine optimisation (SEO) and search advertising, or paid search.

Search Engine Optimisation (SEO): The process of making a site and its content highly relevant for both search engines and searchers. SEO includes technical tasks to make it easier for search engines to find and index a site for the appropriate keywords, as well as marketing-focused tasks to make a site more appealing to users. Successful search marketing helps a site gain top positioning for relevant words and phrases.

Social Media: A category of sites that is based on user participation and user-generated content. They include social networking sites like Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook or user-generated sites like YouTube, Pinterest, and Instagram. Webinar: A virtual web-based seminar. These can take the shape of a panel discussion, lecture, presentation, workshop, or seminar. Webinars are becoming more and more effective and a cost-effective way of sharing knowledge and skills to a wider audience.

Webinar: A virtual web-based seminar. These can take the shape of a panel discussion, lecture, presentation, workshop, or seminar. Webinars are becoming more and more effective and a cost-effective way of sharing knowledge and skills to a wider audience.

Download the Unlock The Code For Online Success: Bringing SEO To The Forefront passnote by clicking here…

Countdown to IFSEC 2016: 10 Tips For PR Success

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IFSEC and FIREX allow exhibitors to meet prospects and customers and provide a great platform to launch products in front of a large audience – expected to be 45,000-strong from more than 150 countries.

Of course, attending an exhibition requires significant investment, organisation, and logistics. It’s vital therefore to maximise your exposure and get the best bang for your buck.

Are you confident that you’ll get the most from your attendance? Have you told enough prospects that you are exhibiting? Are you giving them compelling reasons to visit you? Will you shout louder than – and so stand out from – the rest of the crowd?

With just under two months before doors open, and at the risk of giving your marketing department even more to do, our checklist will help make your exhibition a PR success!

1. Press release

You may have already issued a press release previewing your attendance. If not, you’ll need something that provides journalists and their readers with an overview of what they can expect to see on your stand.

Issue a well-written and newsworthy story to your core media as soon as possible. Many print deadlines will have passed, but online publications will publish right up to, and during, the show.

2. Press pack

This press release will also form the basis of an overview for your press pack, but you might want to include additional product press releases that provide in-depth information about any products being launched at the show.

Also include a company profile if you have one, together with relevant product images.

Don’t overload the pack with brochures or sales collateral. Submit your pack to organisers in good time and it will be made available for attending media.

3. Media interviews

Ask journalists to visit your stand for interviews and product showcases.

Hundreds of exhibitors will vie for attention, so offer them a tempting story. Prepare your staff and anticipate the questions that journalists might pose – especially on contentious issues.

4. Advertising and direct marketing

Direct marketing messages, whether to leads on your own database or to data gathered for the show, can highlight your attendance at the exhibition. Advertising, meanwhile, generates brand awareness.

Well-placed advertising in online media also drives traffic to your website, especially when it carries a tantalising offer or incentive to visit your stand. Do ensure that any website you advertise on can provide accurate and meaningful metrics so you can judge the success of any campaign.

And don’t forget alternatives such as Google AdWords, sponsored tweets, and LinkedIn ads.

5. Social media

Promote your attendance through posts on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook.

Provide teasers on what visitors can expect to see, promote incentives and post daily reports throughout the show using images and videos. A decent smartphone is perfectly adequate for capturing these if handled well.

Hashtags such as #IFSEC and #FIREX allows you to jump into other conversations around the exhibitions and exposes your posts to a wider audience. Finally, exhibiting provides a great opportunity to increase your social media following, so promote your social media channels on printed materials and exhibition stand visuals.

6. Incentives

An incentive scheme can lure prospective customers to your stand.

Often something like an iPad is offered, but this is an opportunity to be imaginative, to identify a hook that will resonate with your audience. For example, footfall can be driven by decent, readily accessible refreshments, workshops and brief technical presentations, giveaways, or by using promotional staff to tour the halls and send visitors to your stand.

7. Data capture

IFSEC or FIREX present a golden opportunity to capture sales leads.

A pre-prepared email that thanks people for visiting your stand can be sent at the end of each day. It may seem obvious, but capture a visitor’s interests and grade them according to the business they might provide.

After the event, supplement your data with any databases exhibition organisers or other sources are willing to share.

8. Speaking opportunities

IFSEC and FIREX speaking opportunities allow you to share your technical expertise, demonstrate your understanding of the marketplace and build the profile of your executives.

Keep any presentations brief and educational. Avoid overtly ‘salesy’ language.

And don’t forget to repurpose presentations as blogs, white papers or social media content after the show.

9. Video

Consider producing a video that captures your exhibition stand and products. The cost of hiring a professional crew has plummeted in recent years.

Ask valued customers to answer a few questions on camera to produce short but powerful video testimonials for your website or YouTube channel.

If a dedicated crew is beyond your budget, the exhibition organisers sometimes send a camera crew around the halls. It might be possible to get them to stop by your stand.

10. Establishing ROI

We’ve all heard the question – usually from the FD: “What will we gain by exhibiting?”

Without metrics in place, it is indeed difficult to establish the value of attending a show. However, marketing activity immediately after the exhibition should turn stand visitors into warm sales leads.

The successful conversion of leads then allows you to accurately measure your return on investment. Overlaying this data with any media coverage generated, new social media followers and traffic to your website over the exhibition period will, in turn, capture any boost to brand awareness.

Finally, don’t skip the all-important post-exhibition debrief. What worked? What didn’t?

What did you see on other stands that you could adopt, or improve on?

After all, there’s always next year…

IFSEC International is the biggest security exhibition in Europe taking place over three days between 21 to 23 June 2016 at London ExCeL.

You’ve Got Mail…

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This month we will be mailing out our complete Passnote series pack to clients and members of our contact list.  The pack contains:-

 

All Together Now: Rebranding after a merger or acquisition

Why Blog?: Finding your voice, sharing your vision, amplifying your message

Social Media for B2B Business: There is no better time to ‘get’ social

Unlock The Code For Online Success: Bringing SEO to the forefront

A Measure of Success: How to measure PR activity

The Evolution of the Press Release: Stay Relevant in a Digital Age

The Case History: Illustrating expertise and establishing credibility

 

During 2016, we will be mailing new Passnotes  to be added to the pack.  

Enjoy and do tweet us @Henley_Group with suggestions for future Passnote subjects.

Think #!

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Hashtags have a firm place within the most popular social networks, including Twitter, Facebook, Google+, Instagram, Vine and Pinterest.

The hashtag is likely the most popular means of categorising content on social media.  It makes your own content discoverable and allows you to find relevant content from other people and businesses.

The hashtag also enables you to connect with and engage other social media users based on a common theme or interest.  This remains essential when building new social media communities or campaigns from the ground up.

Knowing how to use hashtags is fundamental to your success on social media.  You may use them, but are you using them to their full potential?

Here are a few best practices to help you achieve that success…

Do’s and Don’ts 

  • Be specific
  • Be relevant
  • Be observant
  • Don’t mention the brand name in all hashtags you create
  • Don’t be too long or too clever
  • Don’t have more hashtags than words

Photo Gallery – The Opening Of The Henley Group Offices With The Honourable Prime Minister Theresa May

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SEO In Numbers

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With over 4 billion web searches each day, how can you ensure potential customers will find your brand, product or service? When they click the search button, will you appear on page 1 or page 10? Will you appear at all?

1. There are over two billion people online – 38 million of them are in the UK

2. 93% of online experiences begin with a search engine

3. Google owns 68% of the search engine market share

4. 70% of the links search users click on is organic

5. 70-80% of users ignore the paid ads, focusing on the organic results

6. Search is the #1 driver of traffic to content sites, beating social media by more than 300%

7. SEO leads have a 14.6% close rate, while outbound leads (such as direct mail or print advertising) have a 1.7% close rate

8. 75% of users never scroll past the first page of search results

9. The higher the rank position the better on Google: 18% of organic clicks go to the #1 position 10% of organic clicks go to the #2 position 7% of organic clicks go to the #3 position

Reference: www.searchenginejournal.com

To read more about the importance of SEO download our Passnote: Unlock The Code For Online Success: Bringing SEO to the Forefront 

Going Places…

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New home of The Henley Group International Limited.

As of Monday 9 November 2015 we have packed up our press cuttings and have relocated to the centre of Henley-on-Thames:

The Henley Group International Ltd, Market House, 33 Market Place, Henley-on-Thames, Oxon, RG9 2AA

We look forward to welcoming you to the new offices.

Scan the QR code to add the new address to your contacts

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scan the QR code to add our new address to your contacts.